More

Deep V-Neck Sweater

As anyone who has ever knit a sweater knows, it can be a real juggling act! With this Deep V-Neck Sweater, I had the happy and lucky experience of somehow, someway managing to keep all the balls in the air. A seamless set-in sleeve pattern, a spectacularly seductive yarn and a very forgiving fit, all conspired to work together in beautiful harmony!

While set-in sleeves are perhaps the most flattering sweater construction, they traditionally involve the dreaded last step of laboriously sewing together all those pesky pieces. Determined to avoid that tedium, I embarked on this project armed with a few vague notes from Elizabeth Zimmermann and a cannot-fail doggedness (sound familiar, knitters?). Turns out a seamless set-in sleeve sweater is not only possible, it's fascinating and absolutely easy!

And what about that incredible yarn? Alchemy's Kozmos is an extraordinary blend of silk, mohair, wool and cotton, all hand dyed together to create a fuzzy, shiny, nubbly complexity of color and texture. It is this sweater's magic ingredient, infusing it with a truly unique flavor, expressive, elegant and very feminine. 

The Materials

  • 6 skeins of Alchemy Kozmos, 30% Silk, 26% Mohair, 13% Wool, 31% Cotton. This color is Platinum.
  • A US #8, 24 inch circular needle
  • A US #8, 12 inch circular needle
  • 2 double pointed needles, any size equal to or smaller than US #8
  • 4 stitch holders
  • 4 stitch markers
  • OPTIONAL: For a snugger fit around the waist and arm bands, use US #7 circular needles for the ribbing (24 inch for the waist and 12 inch for the sleeves). I didn't do this, but next time I would consider it. It just depends on your body and taste!

The Pattern

Gauge

For Size Small: 5 stitches = 1 inch in stockinette stitch

For Size Medium: 4.75 stitches = 1 inch in stockinette stitch (This is the size pictured in the pattern.)

For Size Large: 4.5 stitches = 1 inch in stockinette stitch

Finished Sizes

Small (Medium, Large)

Waist Circumference: 36 (38, 40) inches

From Shoulder to Shoulder Across the Back: 14 (14 3/4, 15 1/2 inches

From Bottom Edge to Underarm: 13 inches (with directions on how to vary)

Pattern Note

You will be asked to "purl 2 together through the back loop" (p2tog tbl). Here's how:

1. Slip the first 2 stitches knitwise from the left needle to the right needle.

2. Slip them back onto the left needle, maintaining their orientation. These 2 stitches are now on the left needle in a twisted position.

Reach your right needle around to the knit side of the work and insert the tip through the back of the second stitch and then through the first.

Now bring the tip of the right needle to the front of the work and purl together those two stitches.

That's it! Now...

Begin

With the 24 inch circular needle, cast on 180 stitches.

Place a marker and join for working in the round, being careful to not twist the stitches.

Round 1: *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat Round 1 until piece measures 6 inches from cast on edge (or whatever your measurement is from the bottom of your hip bone to the middle of your waist).

Next Round: Knit 41, place a marker (pm), p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1, knit to end of round.

Next Round: Knit to first marker, p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1, knit to end of round.

Repeat last round 4 more times.

Shaping the V

NOTE: For the rest of the sweater, you will be working back and forth in rows, turning the work at the end of each row.

Preparation Row (right side): Remove the end-of-the-round marker, knit to first marker, remove marker, p1, k1, p1, k1, turn the work so the purl side is facing you.

Row 1 (wrong side): [P1, k1] 2 times, purl to last 4 stitches, [k1, p1] 2 times.

Row 2 (right side): [K1, p1] 2 times, ssk, knit to last 6 stitches, k2tog, [p1, k1] 2 times. (2 stitches decreased)

Row 3: Repeat Row 1.

Row 4: [K1, p1] 2 times, knit to last 4 stitches, [p1, k1] 2 times.

Repeat Rows 1-4 eight more times. 162 stitches

Repeat Rows 1 and 2. 160 stitches

Separate for Armholes

Row 1: [P1, k1] 2 times, p 37, put last 12 stitches on a stitch holder, p 90, put last 12 stitches on a stitch holder, purl to last 4 stitches, [k1, p1] 2 times. 29 stitches for each front and 78 stitches for the back.

Set the body aside.

Right Sleeve

With the 12 inch circular needle and a new ball of yarn, cast on 64 stitches.

Place a marker and join for working in the round, being careful to not twist the stitches.

Round 1: *K2, p2, repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat Round 1 until piece measures 5 inches from cast on edge.

Knit for 1 1/2 inches.

Next Round: K 6, put last 12 stitches on a stitch holder (removing the marker), cut the yarn, leaving a 24 inch tail. 52 stitches

Attach the Right Sleeve

Now return to the body with the right side facing, [K1, p1] 2 times, knit to first stitch holder, pm.

Situating the underarm stitch holders (one from the body and one from the sleeve) so that they are parallel and next to each other...

...knit across the right sleeve stitches, pm, knit across the back stitches to next stitch holder.

Set the body aside.

Make and Attach Left Sleeve

Make the left sleeve identical to the right sleeve.

Returning to the body, pm, situate the stitch holders parallel to each other and knit the left sleeve stitches, pm, knit to last 4 stitches, [p1, k1] 2 times.  240 total stitches: 29 stitches for each front, 52 stitches for each sleeve, and 78 stitches for the back.

Begin Working Set-In Sleeves

NOTE: Instead of every 4 rows, from now on you will decrease for the V-neck every 6 rows. Don't worry, the pattern will let you know!

Row 1 (wrong side): [P1, k1] 2 times, *purl to 2 stitches before next marker, p2tog tbl (see Pattern Note above), purl to next marker, slip marker, p2tog**, repeat from * to **, purl to last 4 stitches, [k1,p1] 2 times. (4 stitches decreased)

Row 2 (right side): [K1, p1] 2 times, *knit to 2 stitches before next marker, k2tog, knit to next marker, slip marker, ssk**, repeat from * to **, knit to last 4 stitches, [p1, k1] 2 times. (4 stitches decreased)

Row 3: Repeat Row 1.

Row 4: [K1, p1] 2 times, ssk, *knit to 2 stitches before next marker, k2tog, knit to next marker, slip marker, ssk**, repeat from * to **, knit to last 6 stitches, k2tog, [p1, k1] 2 times. (6 stitches decreased)

222 total stitches: 24 stitches for each front, 52 stitches for each sleeve, and 70 stitches for the back.

Decreasing the Sleeve Stitches

Row 1 (wrong side): [P1, k1] 2 times, purl to last 4 stitches, [k1, p1] 2 times.

Row 2 (right side): [K1, p1] 2 times, *knit to next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit to 2 stitches before next marker, k2tog**, repeat from * to **, knit to last 4 stitches, [p1, k1] 2 times. (4 stitches decreased)

Rows 3 and 4: Repeat Rows 1 and 2. (4 stitches decreased)

Row 5: Repeat Row 1.

Row 6: [K1, p1] 2 times, ssk, *knit to next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit to 2 stitches before next marker, k2tog**, repeat from * to **, knit to last 6 stitches, k2tog, [p1, k1] 2 times. (6 stitches decreased)

Repeat Rows 1-6 until 26 sleeve stitches remain for each sleeve, ending with Row 2.  162 total stitches: 20 stitches for each front, 26 stitches for each sleeve, 70 stitches for the back.   

Accelerate the Sleeve Decreases

Row 1 (wrong side): [P1, k1] 2 times, *purl to next marker, slip marker, p2tog, purl to 2 stitches before next marker, p2tog tbl**, repeat from * to **, purl to last 4 stitches, [k1, p1] 2 times. (4 stitches decreased)

Row 2 (right side): [K1, p1] 2 times, *knit to next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit to 2 stitches before next marker, k2tog**, repeat from * to **, knit to last 4 stitches, [p1, k1] 2 times. (4 stitches decreased)

Row 3: Repeat Row 1.

Row 4: [K1, p1] 2 times, ssk, *knit to next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit to 2 stitches before next marker, k2tog**, repeat from * to **, knit to last 6 stitches, k2tog, [p1, k1] 2 times. (6 stitches decreased)

Rows 5 and 6: Repeat Rows 1 and 2.

Repeat Rows 1-6 until 10 sleeve stitches remain, ending with Row 2. 128 total stitches: 19 for each front, 10 for each sleeve, and 70 for the back.

The Left Front

NOTE: For this section you will be working the left front stitches and half of the left sleeve stitches only. You will also no longer be decreasing for the V-Neck.

Row 1 (ws): [P1, k1] 2 times, purl to first marker, slip marker, p2tog. 1 stitch decreased. Turn the work so the right side is facing you and work back over these same stitches.

Row 2 (rs): Knit to last 4 stitches, [p1, k1] 2 times. Turn work.

Repeat Rows 1 and 2 two more times.

The next row finishes the left front and starts the back...

Next Row: [P1, k1] 2 times, purl to first marker, slip marker, p2tog, purl to 2 stitches before next marker, p2tog tbl, slip marker, purl to next marker, slip marker, p2tog. Turn work so knit side is facing you. 122 total stitches: 19 stitches for each front, 5 for left sleeve, 9 for right sleeve and 70 for the back.

The Back

NOTE: Now you will be working back and forth on just the back stitches and some of the sleeve stitches.

Row 1 (rs): Knit to 2nd marker, slip marker, k2. Turn work.

Row 2 (ws): P2tog tbl, purl to 2nd marker, slip marker, p2tog. 2 stitches decreased. Turn work.

Repeat Rows 1 and 2 two more times. 116 total stitches: 19 stitches for each front, 2 for left sleeve, 6 for right sleeve and 70 for the back.

Raising the Back with Short Rows

Now you're going to work short rows over just the back stitches. Click here for a great Short Row Tutorial to help you through!

Row 1 (rs): Knit to 5 stitches before 2nd marker, wrap and turn.

Row 2 (ws): Purl to 5 stitches before next marker, wrap and turn.

Row 3: Knit to 5 stitches before next wrapped stitch, wrap and turn.

Row 4: Purl to 5 stitches before next wrapped stitch, wrap and turn.

Repeat Row 3.

Next Row (ws): Purl to the last 4 stitches of the entire row, picking up the wraps as you work, [k1, p1] 2 times. (Don't worry that you picked up only half of the wrapped stitches. We'll get to the other half later! It's also okay that there is one fewer wrap on the right than on the left. No one will ever know!)

The Right Front

Now working just the stitches of the right front and some of the stitches of the right sleeve...

Row 1 (rs): [K1, p1] 2 times, knit to first marker, slip marker, ssk. 1 stitch decreased. Turn work so wrong side is facing you.

Row 2 (ws): Purl to last 4 stitches, [k1, p1] 2 times. Turn work.

Repeat Rows 1 and 2 two more times.

Next Row: [K1, p1] 2 times, knit to first marker, slip marker, ssk, knit to last 4 stitches of the entire row, picking up the wrapped stitches as you work. Place the last 4 stitches of the row on scrap yarn. 112 total stitches: 19 stitches for each front (including 4 on hold), 2 for each sleeve and 70 for the back.

Grafting the Shoulders

Slip the first 16 stitches onto a double pointed needle (removing the stitch marker).

Slip the next 16 stitches onto a second double pointed needle (removing the marker).

Cut the yarn, leaving a 24 inch tail, and use the Kitchener Stitch to graft the left front to the back.

With the right side facing you and using a double pointed needle, join a new yarn to the right front.

Bind off 4 stitches in k1, p1 pattern.

Slip the next 15 stitches onto this same double pointed needle (removing the stitch marker). (You should have 16 stitches on the needle.)

Slip the next 16 stitches onto a second double pointed needle (removing the marker).

Cut the yarn, leaving a 24 inch tail, and use the Kitchener Stitch to graft the right front to the back. 40 stitches remain for the back.

Finishing the Neckband

Slip the 4 edge stitches from the scrap yarn onto a double pointed needle.

With the right side facing you and joining new yarn, use the circular needle (that is holding the back stitches) to pick up 1 stitch from between the ribbing and the back stitches.

Still using the circular needle, slip 1 stitch from the neck ribbing and pass the picked up stitch over, k1, p1, k1. Turn the work so the wrong side is facing you.

Now using just the circular needle...

Row 1 (ws): P1, k1, p1, k2tog (the last stitch of the ribbing with the first stitch of the back). Turn work.

Row 2 (rs): Slip the first back stitch from the right needle onto the left needle, p2tog (the slipped stitch and the first stitch of the ribbing), k1, p1, k1. Turn work.

Repeat the last 2 rows until all of the back stitches have been knit, ending with Row 2.

Next Row (ws): P1, k1, p1, slip 1, keep the yarn in front and pick up a stitch from between the back and the right front ribbing (insert the right needle from the right side of the work to the wrong side and purl the stitch to pick it up), pass the slipped stitch over.

Next Row (rs): Bind off in p1, k1 pattern.

Cut the yarn, leaving a 12 inch tail.

Sew the two bound off edges of the ribbing together.

Finishing

Use the Kitchener Stitch to graft the underarms together.

Weave in all the ends and gently block. You're all done!

Click here to add a comment

41 Responses to Deep V-Neck Sweater


  1. Sara L. says:

    This is a lovely, interesting pattern, but is there any way we can see it on a human? I'm trying to decide if I could even wear this, and what it would look like, over a camisole or something.

  2. purl bee says:

    Hi Sara-

    We don't have a picture of it on a human but we have tried it on and it looks great over a camisole.

    Thanks for your question.

    Molly

  3. Iroknits says:

    Thanks for the pattern.. it's a gorgeous sweater and so versatile. However for someone deeply deeply allergic to mohair, would you recommend an alternative yarn (preferable for warm weather)?

  4. purl bee says:

    Hi Iroknits,

    We have so many beautiful choices! Here's a link to our “worsted weight” yarns: http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/3-knitting-crochet-yarn?filters=6 .

    If you let me know what gauge/size you're thinking of knitting, I'd be happy to steer you toward some of my favorites!

    Thanks for asking!
    Whitney

  5. Lily says:

    What a fabulous, albeit slightly intimidating, project! Question though: When attaching the sleeves, do you knit the stitches together from both the sleeve's stitch holder and the body's stitch holder? Or knit only those 12 stitches from the sleeve's stitch holder and then just drop the stitches from the body stitch holder? I have never done set in sleeves so this is all very new to me.

  6. Stefanie says:

    Hi, Whitney! I LOVE all your patterns.

    I bought all the yarn to start my sweater! I just have some questions about the size. I usually wear an XS, but I'm a curvy XS. Did you measure the body circumference at the bust, waist, or hip? When the sweater is laying flat, does it have a natural curve to the waist or fairly straight? I'm debating on sticking to your S pattern or moving down a couple needle sizes for a smaller fit. I love this sweater, I just want to be sure that it's fitted, but not too tight in the bust.

    Thank you for your input!

  7. purl bee says:

    HI Stefanie,

    The “Body Circumference” is measured at the waist, right below where the V-neck starts (actually, I just changed the pattern to say “Waist Circumference” instead!). This number should be about 2-3 inches bigger than your actual waist measurement.

    I didn't size this sweater around the chest because the wide V-neck makes that measurement a bit misleading. But for your information, the fabric at the chest (measured right under the arms) is 32 inches for the small size. Just remember that there is a generous opening right there and that the chest sizing is very flexible!

    And to answer your question about the “natural curve to the waist”, the only shaping throughout the sweater is creating by the natural pulling in of the ribbing. To create a more dramatic curve, I would suggest knitting the ribbing on a smaller needle.

    Having said all that, I would say that generally speaking this sweater fits quite true to size and that if your only concern is the chest being too tight, I would probably go ahead with the XS size.

    Good luck and please let us know if you have any more question!

    Thanks!
    Whitney

  8. Robin says:

    Since the only reference I see to sizing is in the guage do you adjust sizing by changing needle size?

  9. purl bee says:

    Hi Robin-

    Yes you adjust the needle size to change the gauge.

    Thanks for your question!

    Molly

  10. Meghan says:

    Separate for Armholes
    Row 1: [P1, k1] 2 times, p 37, put last 12 stitches on a stitch holder, p 90, put last 12 stitches on a stitch holder, purl to last 4 stitches, [k1, p1] 2 times. 29 stitches for each front and 78 stitches for the back.

    I am confused here. Are you suppose to p 37 and then put the last 12 stitches of the 37 you just purled on a stitch holder?If so… How do you continue purling the next 90. This is my first sweater.

  11. Stewart says:

    Hi, Can anyone answer Lily's question above? I have the same one. When attaching the sleeves are we to knit only the stitches on the sleeve stitch holder and leave the stitches on the body stitch holder? If so, what do we do with the stitches we left on the body stitch holder? Thanks!

  12. Stewart says:

    I think i've figured it out. We are to attach the sleeve using the stitches on the needle, not the stitches on the stitch holder. It appears the stitches on both stitch holders are to be grafted at the end. Right? Thanks!

  13. purl bee says:

    Hi Meghan,

    Yes, you do purl 37 and then put the last 12 of the 37 on hold. You continue purling just by putting your right needle into the next stitch on the left needle and purling! The yarn will be coming from the last stitch on the stitch holder.

    I hope this clarifies things for you. Please let us know if you need more help!

    Thanks,
    Whitney

  14. purl bee says:

    Hi Lily and Stewart,

    I'm sorry for not answering your question earlier, Lily. I thought I had! And thank you, Stewart, for reminding me! It sounds like you've figured it out, but for Lily and whoever else might need more clarification:

    When you attach the sleeves you only knit the sleeve stitches that are on the knitting needle. You don't touch the underarm stitches that are on the holders until the very end when you graft them together.

    Thank you both for asking and good luck!
    Whitney

  15. cassie says:

    Seeing this sweater only makes me wish I knew how to knit even more! I'm a crochet-holic and cant even hold knitting needles the proper way!
    Beautiful pattern!

  16. Laura says:

    I'm a little confused by your description of p2tog tbl. It sounds like ssp. Is there a difference?

    Cute pattern! I haven't tried EZ's set-in sleeve yet, but I plan to soon.

  17. purl bee says:

    Hi Laura,

    Yes, p2tog tbl is the same as a slip slip purl. Good point! I'll add the piece of information to our tutorial right now!

    Thanks!
    Whitney

  18. Karen Lynn/Jane Jetson on Rav says:

    I just happened upon your beautiful and informative website. I, too, noticed the P2tog tbl issue. You are describing an SSP. P2tog tbl is different, there is no slipping knitwise, just simply purling through the back loops together as one. The P2tog tbl, when done on the WS, leans left on the RS. The SSP, when done on the WS. appears to stand up straighter on the RS. This small difference made a big difference on the short row portion of my top down set in sleeves using the YO short row method. I did the P2tog tbl and it looked terrible so I re-read the short row directions and realized I should have done the SSP. I re-did the sleeves and it came out much better!

  19. purl bee says:

    Hi Karen Lynn/ Jane Jetson,

    I think if you check out our Purl 2 Together Through the Back Loop Tutorial (http://www.purlbee.com/decrease-purl-2-together-tbl-p/2012/3/16/decrease-purl-2-together-through-back-loop-p2tog-tbl.html), you'll see the same method you used to make your SSP…?

    Since there's never any circumstance I would just purl 2 together through the back loop without slipping the stitches first, I just think of the p2tog tbl and ssk as the same thing. And in researching the question, I have found that the terms p2tog tbl and ssp are often used interchangeably because both are left leaning on the right side (ie the knit side).

    I'd love to hear back from you to know if we're on the same page. If so, then I think to avoid confusion we should rename our tutorial to include the term SSP. What do you think?

    Thank you so much for this potentially important (and interesting!) observation!

    Whitney

  20. Heather says:

    I love this sweater and I can't wait to start knitting!
    Although I have a question reguarding the sizing… For a size small, do I cast on less stitches, if so, how many?

  21. purl bee says:

    Hi Heather-

    The smaller size is knit exactly the same, just in a smaller gauge. As long as you make sure that you are getting the correct gauge you should be fine.

    Thank you!

    Molly

  22. Heather says:

    For “The Back”

    I'm pretty sure I'm just not seeing it, but where it says
    “Knit to 2nd marker, slip marker, k2. Turn work.”

    Does it mean when you knit through the first marker on the right sleeve, knit the back and then the next marker on the back and left sleeve?
    OR
    knit through the back to the 2 markers on the left sleeve?

  23. purl bee says:

    Hi Heather,

    I think if I had to choose one of your interpretations, it would be the first, but I'm not entirely sure, so here's a further explanation:

    The “second marker” is the one that marks the back left shoulder.

    You should have ended the previous row by slipping the back right shoulder marker, purling 2 together and turning. The Back section starts there, at the back right shoulder marker, and to continue, you knit past it to the back left shoulder marker, slip it, k2 and turn the work. Does this clear things up for you?

    Please let me know if you need nay more help and thank you for your question!

    Whitney

  24. Bev Ludlow says:

    I just finished a sweater from Stitch Nation where I had to create pages of diagrams to get the decreasing in the pattern correct and to fix some pattern errors. This V-neck is an intimidating project, with all its stitch holder stuff, but I'm dying to try it. Some of the comment/questions should be valuable. It's a great sweater. Wish me luck!

  25. YS says:

    Hi. Can you pls tell me if you have bust size for S?
    Thank you!

  26. YS says:

    Hi. Can you pls tell me if you have bust size for S?
    Thank you!

  27. purl bee says:

    Hi YS,

    I didn't include a bust size because the wide V-opening makes the fitting so flexible in the chest.

    But I can tell you that at the underarm, you have 160 stitches, which at 5 stitches to the inch, is 32 inches. And keep in mind that there is also a 4-inch wide opening at that point.

    I hope this answers your question. Please let us know if you have any others and good luck!

    Whitney

  28. Marjorie says:

    If you're having trouble finding a 12" cable (like I did), you can knit the sleeves on a set of five double-pointed needles. It's a bit more tedious, but the end result is the same.

  29. purl bee says:

    Hi Marjorie-

    Just for the future, we carry the 12-inch length of circular needles here: http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/item/8-Skacel-Addi-Turbo-Circular-Needles

    Thanks!

    Molly

  30. SRG says:

    The seamless set-in sleeves are amazingly innovative, you managed to "unvent" an awesome sweater. Any chance you have these set in sleeves worked out in proportions so the technique could be used in other sweaters?

  31. purl bee says:

    Hi SRG,

    I don't have them worked out, but Elizabeth Zimmermann does! To design this sweater I referred her very brief, but informative, section on Set-In Sleeves in her book, Knitting Workshop, page 86. I can't promise that this one page of info will have all your answers, but if you're good at extrapolating, it will set you on the road!

    Here's a link to that book: http://purlbee.squarespace.com/the-purl-bee/2012/1/22/whits-knits-deep-v-neck-sweater.html If you don't already have it, it's a fabulous resource!

    Thanks so much for your question!
    Whitney

  32. Judith says:

    Help, please
    I have read through the instructions, but do better by just "doing". I finished the ribbed bottom and am attempting to begin the body.
    After completing 6" of ribbing, it says to Knit 41, place marker, P1 K1 P1 K2 P1 K1 P1, continue knitting which basically creates a different section 41 stiches away from the true beginning of the round.
    For the body, you work the sweater through the above segregated section, turn the work and go back creating this section as its own row (no knitting to either side.) Doesn't this make a "bump" in the sweater?
    This also seems to create the V 41 stitches away from the natural beginning of the row. Why?
    And, by instructing the removal of the markers, it is difficult to determine the exact stitch to stop and start at.
    I'm so confused.

  33. purl bee says:

    HI Judith,

    It's true that there are 45 stitches (41 + p1, k1, p1, k1) that are worked one more row than the other 135 stitches, but this is not discernible once you have finished the sweater. Lots of knitting patterns (most sweaters and socks) have a hiccup like this in the pattern.

    And you remove the end of the round marker because it no longer marks the end of anything. You don't have to worry about that spot any more! You're now working in rows, and the ends of the rows (at the end of the ribbing) are obvious because that is where you turn the work to start the next row.

    I hope this helps clarify things for you. If not, please let us know! Thanks for your questions!

    Whitney

  34. Wickerbuggy says:

    Tried to print this beautiful pattern to try and cannot. Can it be printed? Where can I get it if not. Positively gorgeous. Luv it.

  35. purl bee says:

    Hi Wickerbuggy-

    We recommend that you copy the text and images you need and paste them into a Word or Text doc. I know it's not ideal but we are working on it!

    Thank you for writing in and good luck with the project.

    Molly

  36. Gina says:

    Hi

    What a beautiful design! Do you think it's possible to create the sweater body first then knit the sleeves directly onto the sweater armholes, as opposed to knitting the sleeves as separate pieces?
    Thanks for posting it!

    Gina

  37. purl bee says:

    Hi Gina,

    It may be possible, but I don't think I've ever seen a set-in sleeve pattern like that. I hope one of our readers will enlighten us if there is such a thing out there!

    A nice thing about this pattern, by the way, is that although you do have to knit the sleeves separately, you don't have to sew them in at the end. Instead, you knit them right into the body of the sweater as you work the chest.

    Thanks for your question and please let us know if you have any more!

    Whitney

  38. trotula says:

    hi gina, this tutorial from bygumbygolly might be what you're looking for: http://bygumbygolly.com/2013/10/how-to-knit-seamless-set-in-sleeves-from-the-top-down/

  39. purl bee says:

    Hi Gina and Trotula,

    Oh, I see what you were asking, Gina! Thank you, Trotula for illuminating the question. Somehow I was imagining a sweater where you knit the yoke and sleeves simultaneously (brain freeze), but yes, of course, as Tortula's link shows, you can pick up armhole stitches and knit the sleeves down from there (using short rows to shape the shoulders). Great resource, Trotula!

    Sorry for the misunderstanding,
    Whitney

  40. Bev Ludlow says:

    OK, I'm in trouble. I just knit the sleeves on, but at the count (just above where the pattern reads, "Begin Working Set-In Sleeves," I have the counts as listed, but also have the 12 for each underarm of the sleeve, giving me a total of 264 stitches, not the 240 mentioned! What did I do wrong? As far as I can see, I have followed the instructions perfectly to this point. Help!

  41. purl bee says:

    Hi Bev,

    It sounds like you're right on! The total number of stitches refers to live stitches and doesn't include the 24 underarm stitches that are on hold.

    Sorry for the confusion. Please let us know if you have any more questions and good luck with the rest of your sweater!

    Whitney

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


three + = 5

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

X

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST!

Subscribers receive a FREE premium Purl Soho Pattern of your choice (up to a $15 value!). learn more