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Rolled Hem Liberty Bandanas

While I have made many simple flat sewing projects, from napkins to burp cloths, I realized recently that I’ve never made a classic bandana!  What an oversight, since bandanas are the most versatile of all squares: a scarf! a headband! a hankie! It’s one of the most useful things you can sew!

Once I got it in my head that I was going to sew a bandana, I knew there was only one fabric that would satisfy my vision: Liberty of London Tana Lawn. I wear a bandana all the time to hold back my hair while I’m sewing, so I kind of couldn’t believe I didn’t have a Liberty Bandana already!

We picked out three stunning Tana Lawn Seasonal prints, each one prettier than the next. After hand sewing them with an easy rolled hem, the bandanas look so sunny and breezy, perfect for spring! And since they’re sized for kids too, little ones don’t have to miss out on the utilitarian beauty  of these Liberty Bandanas!

Materials

To make one bandana you’ll need…

Sizes

Finished measurements: kid (19-inch square) and  adult (22-inch square)

The Pattern

Cutting and Marking

For the kid size cut a 20-inch square of fabric. For the adult size cut a 23-inch square of fabric.

Using your fabric marker on the wrong side of the fabric, draw lines parallel to and 1/2 inch in from each edge.

Sewing

NOTE: If you have never sewn a rolled hem, you might want to check out our Rolled Hem Handkerchiefs, which use the same stitch as these Bandanas. The only difference is that I marked the fabric and used pins.

Moisten your fingers, and starting at a corner, roll one of the edges in to meet the 1/2-inch line. Pin the roll in place.

Continue to roll the edge in this manner, meeting the 1/2-inch line and pinning into place. Stop at the corner.

Cut a length of hand quilting thread at least 2 inches longer than the rolled side and thread it onto a hand sewing needle. Tie a knot at the end of the thread. Insert the needle inside the roll and exit at the bottom edge of the roll (the knot will be hidden inside the roll).

Take a tiny stitch from the fabric below the exit point. Then insert the needle back into the bottom edge of the roll, adjacent to your last exit point, and pull it a 1/4 inch through the roll, moving left.

Take another tiny stitch below this exit point. Pull the needle back through the roll, again exiting 1/4 inch to the left.

Keep sewing the rolled hem down in this manner across the entire length of the edge.

Repeat this process on the opposite side, rolling, pinning and sewing.

Once two opposite sides are complete, roll, pin, and sew the remaining two sides. Make sure to tuck the corners inwards to hide any raw edges.

Spray away the fabric markings and you're all done!

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7 Responses to Rolled Hem Liberty Bandanas


  1. Jane says:

    Very sweet! And thanks for the additional info on pinning rolled hems. Mine seem to end up a bit squished rather than rolled. This should help!

  2. Janimal says:

    How lovely! What a sweet and simple idea. a great project I can take with me on a business trip, so I can unwind with some peaceful handsewing at the end of the day.

  3. Andrea says:

    I love these, so pretty!

  4. debbie says:

    I love the fabric and the bandana, I need to cover all of my hair for religious reasons, is this fabric soft enough for my to make a large bandana to cover all of my hair. What I find is that sometimes cotton is to thick to make a covering that somewhat fits to my head. Thanks

  5. Anne says:

    These bandanas are lovely. I forgot about them, too. They're so much prettier than any old man's hankie. My GS Troop will be rewarded learning a new hand sewing skill. Thank you.

  6. Janimal says:

    How lovely! What a sweet and simple idea. a great project I can take with me on a business trip, so I can unwind with some peaceful handsewing at the end of the day.

  7. Amanda says:

    These are lovely and I have have done two so far but finally got the hang of the rolling on number three (slow learner here). I just wanted to share that I found not only moistening my fingers, but also pulling the fabric that you are rolling taut with your left hand helps it roll tighter. These are so fun to make. Thank you!

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