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Sunday
Mar172013

Laura's Loop: The Sweatshirt Sweater

I grew up wearing a school uniform, which, for me, turns out to be a hard habit to kick. Some people seem to totally reject their childhoods of forced attire, opting for recklessly eclectic wardrobes. But I can't fight it; I'm a uniform kid, through and through.

I am sure you'll be relieved to read I am no longer sporting ill-fitting plaid jumpers, but there is rarely a day that goes by that I'm not in my own personal uniform. Lately, it's been dark-wash Levi's paired with some form of a baseball T or an athletic-gray sweatshirt. Naturally, I need handknit interpretations of these basics! I accomplished the first this past autumn when I stitched up the Everyday Linen Raglan. And now, I'm happy to add a thicker, cozier, woolier version to my collection... the Sweatshirt Sweater!
The Sweatshirt Sweater is my new go-to garb, spacious enough for underlayers and soft enough to go without. It's knit in Swans Island 100% organic merino, a beautiful light worsted yarn that evokes a natural refinement. I'll be in this uniform for these last snowy days of March, all the way through the crisp nights of spring!
Spoiler alert: as the seasons change, so does my uniform, so keep your eye out for some more knit basics in the months to come!

The Materials

 

The Pattern

Gauge

5 1/2 stitches = 1 inch in stockinette on larger needles 

Sizes + Dimensions

X-Small (Small, Medium, Large, X-Large)

Finished Chest Circumference: 33 3/4 (37 1/2, 41, 44 3/4, 48 1/4) inches

Finished Hip Circumference: 28 (31, 34, 37, 40) inches

Finished Length from Bottom Edge to Underarm: 14 inches, with directions to adjust 

Finished Length from Shoulder to Underarm: 7 1/2 (8 1/4, 9 1/4, 9 3/4, 10) inches 

Finished Length from Sleeve Cuff to Underarm: 16 (17, 19, 19 1/2, 20 1/2) inches, with direction to adjust

NOTE: Size Small sweater shown here on 34-inch bust dressform with 3 1/2 inches of ease. Please pay close attention to finished dimensions above when selecting which size to make!

Pattern Notes

Slip 1, k2tog, psso (or sk2p): This is a left-slanting double decrease. Slip 1 purlwise, knit 2 together, pass the slipped stitch over the knit stitch and off the needle. 

Knit 3 together (or k3tog): This is a right-slanting double decrease. Insert right needle into next three stitches as if to knit. Knit all three stitches together as if they were one stitch.

Begin Sleeves

With the smaller sized double pointed needles, cast on 42 (45, 51, 54, 60) stitches.

Place marker and join for working in the round, being careful to not twist the stitches.

Round 1:  *K2, p1, repeat from * to end of round. 

Repeat Round 1 until piece measures 3 inches from cast on edge. 

Change to larger double pointed needles.

Round 2: K35 (38, 44, 47, 53), place different color marker (pm), [p1, k2] two times, p1.

** Round 3 (increase round): M1L, knit to next marker, m1R, slip marker (sm), [p1, k2] two times, p1. (2 stitches increased)

Round 4: Knit to next marker, [p1, k2] two times, p1.

Repeat Round 4 five (four, five, four, four) more times.

Repeat from ** eleven (14, 14, 17, 18) more times. 66 (75, 81, 90, 98) stitches

Repeat Round 3. 68 (77, 83, 92, 100) stitches

Note: If you are particularly short (or long) limbed and would like to adjust the length of the sleeve, 

repeat Round 4 fewer (or more) times between increase rounds.

Next Round: K0 (0, 1, 2, 3), place previous 7 (7, 9, 11, 13) stitches on a stitch holder or scrap yarn, removing stitch markers.

Place remaining 61 (70, 74, 81, 87) stitches on scrap yarn or a spare circular needle. 

Make a second sleeve identical to the first.

Begin Body  

With the smaller, 24- or 32-inch circular needle, cast on 168 (186, 204, 222, 240) stitches.

Place marker and connect for working in the round, being careful to not twist the stitches. 

Round 1: *K2, p1, repeat from * to end of round. 

Repeat Round 1 until piece measures 2 1/4 (2 1/4, 2 1/4, 2 1/2, 2 1/2, 3) inches. 

Next Round (increase round): *K5, k1fb, [k8, k1fb] 8 (9, 10, 11, 12) times, [k2, p1] two times, repeat from * to end of round. 186 (206, 226, 246, 266 stitches)

Next Round: With larger, 24- or 32-inch circular needle, *k86 (96, 106, 116, 126), place different color marker, [p1, k2] two times, p1, repeat from * to end of round. 

Next Round: *Knit to next marker, [p1, k2] two times, p1, repeat from * to end of round. 

Repeat last round until piece measures 3 1/4 (3 1/4, 3 1/4, 3 1/2, 3 1/2, 4) inches from cast on edge. 

Mark for Pouch (Optional)

Note: If you are not making the pouch, skip to the "Continue" section.

Round 1: K7, mark this 7th stitch with a removable stitch marker, *knit to next marker, [p1, k2] two times, p1, repeat from * to end of round.

Continue working in established pattern until piece measures 10 (10 1/4, 10 1/2, 11, 12) inches from cast on edge.

Make the Pouch (Optional)

With the extra larger circular needle, starting with (and including) the marked stitch, slip the point of the needle under the right leg of the following 74 (84, 94, 104, 114) stitches

Remove the removable marker. 

For this section, you will be working just the 74 (84, 94, 104, 114) pouch stitches. You'll work back and forth in rows, turning the piece at the end of each row.

Row 1 (right side): K1, p1, [k2, p1] two times, knit to last 8 stitches, [p1, k2] two times, p1, k1. 

Row 2 (wrong side): P1, k1, [p2, k1] two times, purl to last 8 stitches, [k1, p2] two times, k1, p1.

Row 3 (decrease row): K1, p1, [k2, p1]  two times, ssk, knit to last 10 stitches, k2tog, [p1, k2] two times, p1, k1. (2 stitches decreased)

Repeat Rows 2 and 3 eighteen (19, 20, 21, 22) more times. 36 (44, 52, 60, 68) stitches

Repeat Row 2.

Cut yarn, leaving the stitches on the needle.

Graft the Pouch (Optional)

To graft the pouch stitches to the body of the sweater...

Returning to the body of the sweater and continuing from where you left off, k25 (26, 27, 28, 29). Now holding the pouch needle and sweater needle parallel to each other, *knit one stitch from the front pouch needle together with one stitch from the back sweater needle, repeat from *until all the pouch stitches have been knit. Now continuing with just the body stitches and working again in the round, **knit to next marker, [p1, k2], two times, p1, repeat from ** to end of round. 

Continue

Continue working in established pattern until body of sweater measures 14 inches from cast on edge or desired length to underarm.

Attach the Sleeves

Round 1: *Knit to next marker, [p1, k2] two times, p1, k0 (0, 1, 2, 3), place previous 7 (7, 9, 11, 13) stitches on a stitch holder (removing marker), knit to next marker, [p1, k2] two times, p1. 179 (199, 217, 235, 253) stitches

Round 2: K0 (0, 1, 2, 3), place previous 7 (7, 9, 11, 13) stitches on a stitch holder (removing marker), knit to first stitch holder, pm, orient the sleeve's on-hold underarm stitches so they are parallel and next to the body's on-hold underarm stitches and knit the sleeve stitches (starting with the stitch to the right of the stitches on hold), pm, knit to next stitch holder, pm, knit the second sleeve stitches, place a different color marker (this is the new end of the round). 294 (332, 356, 386, 414) total stitches: 86 (96, 104, 112, 120) stitches for front and back, 61 (70, 74, 81, 87) stitches for each sleeve  

Begin Raglan

Round 1: *P1, k2, p1, knit to 4 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, knit to three stitches before next marker, p1, k2, sm, repeat from * to end.

Repeat Round 1 two more times.

Next Round (decrease round): *P1, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 6 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to five stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, repeat from * to end. (8 stitches decreased) 

Repeat Round 1. 

Repeat last two rounds sixteen (19, 21, 23, 25) more times. 158 (172, 180, 194, 206) total stitches: 52 (56, 60, 64, 68) stitches for front and back, 27 (30, 30, 33, 35) stitches for each sleeve 

Continue Raglan and Shape Crew Neck

You will no longer be working in the round but back and forth in rows, turning the work at the end of each row.

Row 1 (right side): P1, k2, p1, k22 (24, 26, 28, 30), turn work so that wrong side (the inside of the sweater) is facing you. Where you just turned will now be considered the end of the row, and what was previously considered the end-of-round marker is now just a regular marker.

Row 2 (wrong side): Bind off 6 (6, 6, 8, 8) stitches purlwise, [purl to 4 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, k1, sm, p2, k1, purl to 3 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, sm, k1, p2, k1] two times, purl to end of row. 152 (166, 174, 186, 198) total stitches

Row 3 (raglan shaping row): Bind off 6 (6, 6, 8, 8) stitches knitwise, [knit to 6 stitches before marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 5 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, ssk] two times, knit to end of row. 138 (152, 160, 170, 182) stitches

Row 4: Bind off 3 (3, 3, 4, 4) stitches purlwise, [purl to 4 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, k1, sm, p2, k1, purl to 3 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, sm, k1, p2, k1] two times, purl to end of row.  135 (149, 157, 166, 178) stitches

Row 5 (raglan shaping row): Bind off 3, (3, 3, 4, 4) knitwise, [knit to 6 stitches before marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 5 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, ssk] two times, knit to end of row. 124 (138, 146, 154, 166) stitches

Row 6 : Bind off 2 (2, 2, 3, 3) stitches purlwise, [purl to 4 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, k1, sm, p2, k1, purl to 3 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, sm, k1, p2, k1] two times, purl to end of row. 122 (136, 144, 151, 163) stitches

Row 7 (raglan shaping row): Bind off 2 (2, 2, 3, 3) knitwise, [knit to 6 stitches before marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 5 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, ssk] two times, knit to end  of row.  112 (126, 134, 140, 152) stitches 

Row 8: [Purl to 4 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, k1, sm, p2, k1, purl to 3 stitches before next marker, k1, p2, sm, k1, p2, k1] two times, purl to end. 

Row 9 (raglan shaping row): Ssk, [knit to 6 stitches before marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 5 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, ssk] two times, knit to last 2 stitches, k2tog. (10 stitches decreased) 

Repeat Rows 8 and Row 9 two (3, 4, 3, 4) more times. 82 (86, 84, 100, 102) total stitches: 12 (12, 12, 12, 12) total for the front, 40 (42, 44, 50, 52) for back, 15 (16, 14, 19, 19) for each sleeve

For XS (Small, Large, XLarge) Sizes Only

Repeat Row 8.

Next Row: [Knit to 6 stitches before marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 5 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, ssk] two times, knit to end of row. 74 (78, 92, 94) stitches: 10 for right and left front, 38 (40, 48, 50) for back, 13 (14, 17, 17) for each sleeve 

For XS Size Only

Repeat Row 8.

Next Row: Knit to 4 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 5 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, skp2 (see pattern notes above), knit to 7 stitches before next marker, k3tog (see pattern notes above), p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 5 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, knit to end of row. 66 total stitches: 10 for  right and left front, 34 for back, 11 for each sleeve

For Medium Size Only

Repeat Row 8.

Next Row: Knit to 6 stitches before marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, knit to 3 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, skp2 (see pattern notes above), knit to 7 stitches before next marker, k3tog (see pattern notes above), p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, knit to 3 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, ssk, knit to end of row. 78 stitches: 10 for right and left front, 40 for back, 14 for each sleeve

For Large Size Only 

Repeat Row 8. 

Next Row: Knit to 4 stitches before marker, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, knit to 3 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, ssk, knit to 6 stitches before next marker, k2tog, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, knit to 3 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, knit to end of row. 90 total stitches: 10 for  right and left front, 46 for back, 17 for each sleeve

For XLarge Size Only

Repeat Row 8.

Next Row: Knit to 4 stitches before marker, p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, knit to 3 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, skp2 (see pattern notes above), knit to 7 stitches before next marker, k3tog (see pattern notes above), p1, k2, p1, sm, k2, p1, knit to 3 stitches before next marker, p1, k2, sm, p1, k2, p1, knit to end of row. 90 total stitches: 10 for  right and left front, 46 for back, 17 for each sleeve

Make Neckband

For this section, you will once again be working in the round, no longer back and forth in rows. 

Continuing with the right side facing you and now using the smaller, 16-inch circular needle, pm (new beginning of round), pick up 30 (33, 36 ,36 ,39) stitches evenly along the front neckline. Continuing around the remaining 66 (78, 78, 90, 90) stitches, *k1, p1, k1,  repeat from * to end of round. 96 (111, 114, 126, 129) stitches

Next Round: *K1, p1, k1,  repeat from * to end of round.

Repeat last round until ribbing measures 1 1/4 (1 1/4, 1 1/2 ,1 3/4 , 2) inches.

Bind off loosely in pattern.

Finish Underarms

Slip one pair of underarm stitches from the stitch holders to two double pointed needles. Holding the needles parallel to one another, use the Kitchener Stitch to graft closed the underarm.

Repeat for second underarm. 

Weave in your ends and you are finished!

 

Reader Comments (97)

I love this design...are the sizes male or female?
March 17, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJen
Espectacular Muchas gracias por el patrón.
March 17, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMatilde
This sweater is so nice! I love it and all of your designs! I am putting this on the top of my list :)
March 18, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterStacy
Hi Jen-

The sizes are female. The finished measurements are listed below the sizes which would help if you were trying to make it for a man.

Thank you!

Molly
March 18, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
What a beautiful pattern! I love how simple it is. Are there any cheaper yarn alternatives you sell that would work for this pattern?
March 18, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCatherine
Hi Catherine-

We would recommend Cascade 220 as a very affordable alternative. It even comes in a great heather gray color!

http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/item/649-Cascade-Yarns-Cascade-220

Thank you for your question!

Molly
March 18, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
So pretty and cozy!
March 18, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterTrishKnits
Hello!
I live in Florida and I absolutly love this sweater! The only problem is that the weather here is much warmer and I'm afraid that the yarn you used to make the sweater would be too hot. What yarns would you recommend that I substite to make a warm, yet light sweater? Thank you for your help!
March 18, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterElizabeth
Hi Elizabeth,
Blue Sky makes a worsted weight cotton that might be nice. It is a little bit thicker so be sure to swatch. It might be dense and tight at 5.5 stitches to the inch at first but should relax after blocking. Also, there is Blue Sky's Skinny Cotton which is a teeny bit thinner.(links posted below).
http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/item/721-Blue-Sky-Worsted-Cotton
http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/item/3823-Blue-Sky-Skinny-Cotton

Spud and Chloe make a wool/cotton blend which might work nicely... http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/item/5886-Spud-Chloe-Sweater

Let me know if you have any other question!
Laura
March 18, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi, Beautiful, classy design! Just wanted to point out that the color Seasmoke is actually a blend of merino and alpaca. So is their oatmeal color, but the rest of the colors are 100% merino.
March 18, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJenB
I love this sweater! So clean yet cozy. Thanks for sharing it.
March 19, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKatie
Hi,

Love this sweater! I've made a couple of sweaters with similar construction, and the underarms never look as good as the ones in your photo -- there are always small gaps at either side of the stitches to be grafted. Is there a way to eliminate this (or at least minimize it), and how do I fix the gaps to get a clean, neat finish?

thanks,
Karen
March 19, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKaren
Thank you so much! I think that I will use Blue Sky's Skinny Cotton. If I use this yarn, will I have to change the needle sizes?
March 19, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterElizabeth
Hi Elizabeth,
It depends on how you knit (on the tight side or on the loose side). I recommend knitting a few 4 inch by 4 inch swatches on a few different needles to see which needle gives you the correct gauge. My hunch though, if you go down in needle size for the Skinny Cotton, your gauge will be off.
Laura
March 20, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi Karen.
I know the exact gaps you are talking about. They can definitely get messy looking if you aren't careful. When I go to graft the underarm stitches together using kitchner stitch, I purposefully leave a longer-than-usual tail so that I will have some yarn to work with after grafting. I don't just weave in the tail, but rather use it to close up those gaps on either side. I find that weaving the tail in using duplicate stitch (or as close to duplicate stitch as possible) across the hole closes it up in the least messy way.

Here is a link to a tutorial that talks about weaving in ends and includes instructions for using duplicate stitch: http://www.purlbee.com/weaving-in-ends-tutorial/

Let us know how it goes or if you have any other questions.
Laura
March 20, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
I am obsessed with this! Ordering the materials this week to make. I am interested in two things...do you have suggestions to add the small "V" at the neckline like in the Everyday Linen Pullover. Also, for my uniform (hoodies, jeans, and flip-flops), this must have a hood...any suggestions for adding one? THANK YOU!
March 20, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJRS
JRS,
You are so kind. Thank you for the positive feedback. Your comment made me laugh actually. You have no idea how many times I thought to add a hood and then I'd take it away, add, eliminate, back and forth. My sketch book is covered. If you wanted to add one... here are some very quick crude tips... I would pick up along the neckline as if you were going to do the ribbing. I would work back and forth for several inches (measure vertically from your shoulder to the top of your head), decreasing along the front edge (so the hood doesn't cover your face. I would do the same ribbed edge as I did at the pocket. You can check out the Petite Popover to see how I seamed that hood: http://www.purlbee.com/petite-popover/

As for the V detail. Again here are some crude tips... About 10 to 14 rows before you are going to start the shaping for the neck, find the center stitch on the front, mark it. Work as usual, but when you get to that marked stitch, purl rather than knit. The next round, purl the stitch before the marked stitch, the marked stitch and the one after it (3 stitches), on the following round, purl 5 stitches, again centered on that marked stitch.

I am hoping to do a similar sweater come fall, but with a hood and some other fun detailing. Stay tuned!

Thanks again for writing in and let me know if you have any questions.
Laura
March 20, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
JRS,
You are so kind. Thank you for the positive feedback. Your comment made me laugh actually. You have no idea how many times I thought to add a hood and then I'd take it away, add, eliminate, back and forth. My sketch book is covered. If you wanted to add one... here are some very quick crude tips... I would pick up along the neckline as if you were going to do the ribbed crew neck, but start at the center of the front. I would work back and forth in stockinette for several inches (measure vertically from your shoulder to the top of your head), decreasing along the front edge (so the hood doesn't cover your face. I would do the same ribbed edge as I did at the pocket, you can refer to that section for decreasing as well. And you can check out the Petite Popover to see how I seamed that hood: http://www.purlbee.com/petite-popover/

As for the V detail. Again here are some crude tips... About 10 to 14 rows before you are going to start the shaping for the neck, find the center stitch on the front, mark it. Work as usual, but when you get to that marked stitch, purl rather than knit. The next round, purl the stitch before the marked stitch, the marked stitch and the one after it (3 stitches), on the following round, purl 5 stitches, again centered on that marked stitch. Continue like this, increasing the number you purl by 2 each round.

I am hoping to do a similar sweater come fall, but with a hood and some other fun detailing. Stay tuned!

Thanks again for writing in and let me know if you have any questions.
Laura
March 20, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi, Laura, Thank for the great design. I usually don't comment, just ooh and ahh; but today, I was laughing out loud while reading your blog. I suspect we have similar childhood. I went to 12 years of Catholic school wearing plaids and a white blouse. And I am sure I beat you, wearing 5 more years of a Coast Guard uniform.

I totally understand still wearing some semblence of a uniform. I have poor concept of accessories; and hate shopping. I can never understand when my friends talk about shopping All day long. There too many other things to do, then walk around a store. OOPs, when I do comment I am long-winded. Love your webstie and all the other designers, too.

Thank you, again.
March 21, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterAnn
Hi Laura,
Just saw this today and am excited to try it! Just wondering about the sizing. The hip size isn't really the waist is it? I feel really dumb about this and probably I'm wrong. What would you suggest for someone who has 37 bust and 37 hips? I don't want it too tight in the bust, but want it to fit over my hips!
March 21, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMichelle
Love, love, love the sweatshirt sweater. Although I am not a knitter, can this be purchased? I would love to have several.
Thank you. :)
March 21, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKaren
Hi Karen-

We don't sell any of our finished projects but if you'd like to get someone to knit one for you please give our shop a call at 212-420-8796. They might be able to put you in touch with a custom knitter.

Thank you!

Molly
March 21, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi Michelle,
Great question. The bottom of the sweater falls above the hip, but below the waist (this is adjustable too of course). It's a hard area to name. The bottom is a rib, which will have some give, very forgiving / flexible. If you have a 37 inch bust, then I would make the Medium size. I have a 34+ inch bust and made the Small, so there was about 3 inches of ease which felt right/comfortable for this cut of a piece.
Please let me know if you have any other questions!
Laura
March 21, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi Laura,

Thank you so so SO much for the assistance, much appreciated. I ended up using a Cascade Baby Alpaca I found yesterday in a Heather Purple color, it is so lovely. I started last night and contemplated calling in sick today to stay at home and knit.
March 22, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJRS
Laura:

Makes a nice "dressy", more flattering sweatshirt look. (I am in a sweatshirt every day when not in work.) In lieu of the wool, would Brown Sheep cotton fleece work? (Of course I don't know if you even sell that.) Thank you for your design.
March 23, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJean
Hi Jean,
That's exactly how I see this piece... a dressier sweatshirt. Glad you like it.

I have never worked with Brown Sheep's Cotton Fleece before. The stats I found online say it's 5 stitches = 1 inch on a US #6. I think as long as you swatch and figure out the right needles for your personal tension so that you hit gauge... It'll be great!

Luck with the sweater. Let me know if you have any questions.
Laura
March 25, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
I spin, and I have a fleece of Rambouillet that is natural white, and wonderful to wear. I haven't done this in a long, long time but I am in love with this sweater. Wonder if 1 or 2 ply would be better. It gets chilly here but I love sweaters and I love kangaroo pockets. Perfect for me and my jeans.

If you ever want to try Rambouillet, don't be afraid. It's very soft, usually full of lanolin, and a pleasure to wear. The fibers are long staple and it makes a beautiful yarn.
March 27, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMay
Thanks for the great tutorial! Every time you think you've researched every possibility out there, there's always a few more. I'll definitely try duplicate stitch next time to close up those pesky kitchener gaps.

Karen
March 29, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKaren
Wow! You really did it for me. I'm knitting the Sweatshirt sweater right now. What an easy pattern to read and follow. It will be a gift for my daughter and then I'll knit one for myself. Thank you so much, you made my day.
Jo.in Deux-Montagnes QC
March 29, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterLaura
I love this sweater pattern too but I need some help with the increase round for the body. i have already completed the sleeves without any snag. I am having trouble
Understanding the increase directions. Do younmean knit 5 normally and then knit 1 fb and then knit eight normally and then 1 fb a multiple of times?
Thanks for any clarification.
April 1, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterJeanne
Jeanne,
Yes. You are completely correct.
Thank you. It should read k1fb where it says kfb.
K5, k1fb, [k8, k1fb]....

Thank you so much for writing in.
Laura
April 2, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
This pattern looks great! I've read it through a few times but am still trying to understand the raglan sleeve part. I'm making size XS and it seems like you bind off 22 stitches over 8 rows on the front of the sweater. Then when you start the neckband, it says to pick up 30 st. Is that just to keep the neckband looking neat without any gaps? This is the first time I'm knitting raglan sleeves. Any particular reason why you bind off st and work back and forth? It is easier than continuing to work in the round and decreasing?
April 4, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKellye
What a lovely pattern. The pocket really "makes" it. I think I see a big future for this design in my house. Have you considered the option of adding a hood?
April 6, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterBetty
This is a wonderful pattern - thank you! It was a simple, straightforward knit, and I love the end result. The Swan's Island Worsted really makes the project - it's incredibly soft! I blogged the pattern and FO photos here: http://blueberryhillcrafting.com/2013/04/08/swans-island-sweatshirt/
April 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterAndrea Hungerford
Hi Andrea-

Thank you so much for sharing you photos! Your sweater turned out great!

Best-

Molly
April 8, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi KellyE.

I am glad you like the looks of the sweater. To address your questions...
- I begin working in the round, because this is a crew neck and it requites more shaping in the front than just the raglan decreases create alone.

- You can knit raglans in the round all the way to the top. It is definitely an option, structurally speaking.

- So the stitches you pick up for the neck are to make sure it's a nice smooth curved crewneck shape. Typically you pick up 1 stitch for ever bound off stitch and 3 stitches for every slanted or vertical stitch.

I hope this answers anything. PLEASE keep me posted if any other questions come up. Thanks for writing in.
Laura
April 10, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
I just love this! I have already made the sleeves and they fit fine, but for the body I'm not sure size wise. I measure between a sm. and medium and not sure how to adjust for what's needed. Any suggestions?
April 17, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterAndrea
Dear Laura,
I love this pattern very much! I am using Berroco's Comfort Heather colors in Cranberry and Thimbleberry, with the darker color for the sleeves and the kangaroo pouch. I am on the decrease raglan rows right now, and about to begin the neckline shaping, probably in a day or two. This has been a great project to work on, although I have one question. Your pattern indicates to K1, p1 around for the neckline, but in your pictures (for the neckline) and in the instructions you say to K2, P1 for the cuffs of the sleeves and for the beginning of the body. Do you mean that the neckline should also be K2 and P1 around? Thanks so much for the wonderful pattern!
(P.S. I have also knitted your Little Cable Knee High Socks and love love LOVE those!! I want to knit your Herringbone Cowl someday.)

Kelyn
April 18, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKelyn
Hi Kelyn,
I am so glad yo have been enjoying this project.

The neckline says to *k1, p1, k1, repeat from * to end.
So essentially, you are knitting 2 next to one another. It is set up this way so that the ribs of the raglan detail transitions smoothly into the ribs of the neckline.

Please let me know if you have any other questions at all. I love the sounds of the color work you are doing on the sleeves and pouch. Nice modification!
Laura

(The Herringone Cowl is AMAZING. Whitney is quite inspiring, isn't she?!)
April 22, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi Andrea,

The bust circumference provided is the finished dimension of the sweater. I think this style sweater is best with a 2+ inch ease. So, I would probably go up to the medium.

I am a little confused though. You already made the sleeves? The stitch count for the sleeves comes into play when you knit it onto the body of the sweater. Which size sleeve did you make?

If you made one size sleeve and are making a different size body, be careful when it comes to the final rounds of raglan shaping because you'll want the raglan ribbing to seamlessly transition into the ribbing in the neck. Does that make sense?

Please let me know if you have any other questions.
Laura
April 22, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
I think there's an error for the medium size's count when decreasing. Under "Con't Raglan and Shape Crew Neck", it lists the sleeve count for Rows 8 and 9 as 15 (16, **14**, 19, 19) for each sleeve. But then for the last part of this section it lists the sleeves as having **17 stitches**. Will you please clarify this? I'm guessing maybe the sleeves should have decreased down only to 18 stitches in Row 9 repeats.

I also see that it says the final stitch count for size medium is 78 stitches: 10 for right and left front, 40 for back, 17 for each sleeve. By my count, this is 94 stitches. So should I only pick up 20 stitches along my cast-off row to make the called for 114, or should I still cast on the 36 stitches the pattern calls for, giving me a final number of 130?
April 23, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterShea
Hi Shea,

The "17" is a typo. I will fix it now! There are 14 stitches at each sleeve.
78 stitches total (10 at the front, 14 at each sleeve and 40 at the back)
You'll pick up 36 at the neckband making 114.

Thank you so much for writing in!
Please let me know if you have any other questions.
Laura
April 25, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi Shea,

The "17" is a typo. I will fix it now! There are 14 stitches at each sleeve.
78 stitches total (10 at the front, 14 at each sleeve and 40 at the back)
You'll pick up 36 at the neckband making 114.

Thank you so much for writing in!
Please let me know if you have any other questions.
Laura
April 25, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi Andrea,
I am currently working on the sweater but having some difficulty understanding some of the directions when working on the body of the sweater. You say "*Knit to next marker, [p1, k2] two times, p1, repeat from * to end of round." Does this mean to knit all the way until the beginning marker, or should I (p1 k1) two times p1 before I reach the beginning marker?

Thanks for your help!
May 4, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMikhala
Hi Mikhala,

This is Laura, I knit this project and will address your question.

A few lines of pattern before the one you are asking about it tells you to place markers. There is a marker after k86 (96, 106, 116, 126) stitches and then another marker which ends up being 7 stitches before the beginning of round marker. So...

*Knit to next marker, [p1,k2] two times, p1, repeat from * to end of round means....

Knit to the marker, slip it, purl 1, knit 2, purl 1, knit 2 then purl 1 more, then you start at the beginning again meaning... Knit to the marker, slip it, purl 1, knit 2, purl 1, knit 2 then purl 1 more. At this point you will be at the beginning of the round.

Does this help at all?
Please let me know if you have any other questions regarding this pattern.
Thanks,
Laura.
May 6, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hello,

This is my first time ever knitting a sweater, and so far, so good!

I do have a question though (it may be a stupid one): In the "begin the body" section , it says "With the smaller circular needle..." Is this the #6 16-inch needle? And then a few lines down it says "With the larger, 32-inch needle..." is this size #6? or #7? I just want to be sure to use the right ones!

And if it's the #7 32-inch, what is the #6 24-32" for? (I'm relatively new at this, so I keep having to buy new needles for all my projects.)

Thank you for a great pattern! I'm excited to keep going.
May 6, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterLaura
Hi Laura,
Congrats on knitting your first sweater!!!

The smaller, 24- or 32-inch needle is the #6.
The larger 32-inch needle is the #7.

That was a great question. Definitely a little confusing. Thanks for writing in.
Let me know if you have any other questions.
Laura
May 8, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hi! I was wondering, what type of cast on you would recommend for giving this sweater a clean, stretchy edge? Thanks!
May 14, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterElizabeth
Hi Elizabeth.
I used a long tail cast on.
I love the long tail cast on. It is my go-to!
If you are worried about it being tight, cast on with a needle one size up from the recommended size.

Let me know if you have any other questions. Thanks for asking.
Laura
May 15, 2013 | Registered Commenterpurl bee
Hello! I was wondering, do you cut the yarn after you have finished a sleeve? Thank you!
May 29, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterElizabeth

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